Advanced Plan for Health Logo
 

Understanding and Encouraging Hospice Benefits

Understanding and Encouraging Hospice Benefits

Barbara Rutkowski, EdD, MSN, CCM - Vice President, Clinical Operations, Advanced Plan for Health.

This is an important topic our clients are seeking information on, so we wanted to share more details here. Health systems can save money and human misery when they better understand end-of life care options.

Palliative care and hospice are different. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) – National Institute on Aging (NIA) shares some valuable clarification and information. While both include a multidisciplinary approach to relieving symptoms and providing comfort, palliative care may also include curative treatment, whereas hospice does not. Palliative care can be a good segue to hospice. To qualify for hospice care, providers must believe that, assuming a normal course of illness, an individual has six months or less to live. However, estimating remaining life is difficult, and improvements in care through hospice may extend life, while definitely enhancing access to necessary healthcare and comfort measures.

Millennials: Who Needs Primary Care Physicians? Give Us On-demand Healthcare

Millennials: Who Needs Primary Care Physicians? Give Us On-demand Healthcare

We'd like to extend a big thank you to our guest blog contributor - John Milne, Benefits Consultant, Corporate Synergies®

Millennials, and Generation Z behind them, are changing the way they access healthcare. In fact, 45% of 18- to 29-year-olds say they don’t have a primary care physician.1 Instead, they’re opting for on-demand healthcare.

Traditionally, individuals and families see primary care physicians several times a year and build relationships with their doctors over time. Visiting the same primary care physician when an illness strikes, or for an annual health & wellness checkup, can help the doctor notice changes in a patient’s health and catch issues before they become more serious (and costly).

But for Millennials, having a primary care physician isn’t necessarily a priority.